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Bram Stoker's Dracula

1992

Bram Stoker's Dracula
 

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Review

Francis Ford Coppola consciously harks back to the original story, much more than many so-called Dracula movies, and the film is a powerful and well made version. There are variations from the original, of course, but most are fairly minor, and were probably necessary to fit the whole thing into about two hours.

The really significant change is the addition of a potted history of how Dracula came to be; it's a plausible tale (though historically speaking, twaddle), and it allows Our Villain to be seen as victim, rather than pure evil. Trouble is, they take that rather too far, and at times he's positively sentimental, which rather undermines the nastier moments.

The real problem with this lavish and loving production is the casting. Gary Oldman is fine for the softer figure they've created, but he wouldn't last five minutes against Buffy - or, for that matter, against a decent Van Helsing.

Anthony Hopkins really is hopelessly miscast and is camping it up like a late Hammer Horror movie. In the book, VH is an educated, gentle, committed man, who spends whole chapters leaning over backward to spare people's feelings. Here, he's a loutish buffoon, with all the tact of Eddie Murphy on a bad day.

Winona Ryder, not for the first time (or the last), was trying to prove that she can do more than Ms Wholesome America; but she can't. Beautiful though she is, you can't help but conclude that any decent Van Helsing would be saying "But what does Dracula see in her?"; especially when contrasted with her oversexed Best Pal.

But while watching the movie, these things are trivia. The direction is excellent, with a (usually) fast pace, with excellent editing and fine camera work. The sets are just great for creating the period, and the supporting cast is superb (Tom Waits has found his niche!).

The supporting documentary is the usual well-rehearsed smarmy interviews, but there are a few titbits in there. The highlight is the expression on Anthony Hopkins face; he says all the right things, clearly doesn't believe a word of it, and is amazed that he's got away with it!

The DVD

  • Starring: Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder, Anthony Hopkins
  • Director: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Encoding: Read more about DVD formats
  • Language: English
  • Format: Color, Closed-captioned, Widescreen
  • Rated: Not for sale to persons under age 18.
  • Studio: Columbia/Tristar Studios
  • DVD Release Date: September 30, 1997

Special Features

  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Filmographies
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85 Wide Screen, 16:9 Wide Screen
  • Available Audio Tracks: Dolby Digital 5.1, Dolby Digital Surround
  • Dubbed Language(s): French, German, Italian, Spanish
  • Sub Titles: Arabic, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish
  • Disc Format: DVD 9
  • Features vary; check before buying

    Read the full text here - in the original order, or in chronological order.


How To Buy This DVD

  • Discs are Region Specific
  • Read about DVD formats.
  • Content - especially extras - may vary between countries of origin

Bram Stoker's Dracula
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The Vampyreverse 10 January 2016 Copyright Andrew Heenan Privacy